Category: Uncategorized (Page 2 of 114)

Throwing It Away? Be Cart Smart

Throwing out plastic bags, clothes, garden hoses, needles or medical sharps? Please don’t use the brown recycling cart – put them in the gray trash cart.

To find a nearby grocery store that accepts plastic bags for recycling, visit bit.ly/howtorecyclebags.

Help the city keep its recycling and trash collection crews safe. Workers can get stuck by medical sharps and syringes that are not in suitable disposal containers.

To dispose of medical sharps and syringes, use containers made of heavy-duty plastic that close tightly with a puncture-proof lid. Label the container and place it in the middle of your household trash in the gray trash cart – or find a disposal program.

Find more community guidelines about safe disposal at bit.ly/howtorecyclesharps.

Got a city recycling or trash cart that’s falling apart? Damaged lift bars on city recycling or trash carts can cut customers and crew members. Call 240-314-8568. We’ll replace it for you.

How to Think Green When You See the White Stuff

Environmentally Friendly Snow- and Ice-Removal Tips

Follow these tips to keep your driveway and sidewalks ice-free, while minimizing the environmental impact.

Shovel Early, Shovel Often
Removing fresh snow before it has a chance to harden into ice is the best way to keep your pavement clear. Deicers work best on thin layers of snow or ice that need to be melted, so shovel first, break up any ice patches you can and then add the salt.

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Won’t You Be My (Good) Neighbor?

Rockville’s Mayor and Council presented Good Neighbor Awards on Nov. 18 to (L to R): Germaine Diouf; Tracy Jackson; Peter Lovell (at rear, in hat), Kathleen Moran (at rear), Madeline Jackson, Sergio Diaz, Jonathan Walker, Joanne Gladden (daughter of Marsha Schwartz), Sorell Schwartz, collecting on behalf of his wife Marsha Schwartz; Eric Fulton; and Melvin Hawkins. Not pictured: Matt Goenner; Arthur Goldberg; and Mike Stein. Learn more about the good deeds of these good neighbors and view video of the awards presentation at bit.ly/GoodNeighbors2019. Learn more about the awards at www.rockvillemd.gov/goodneighbor.

Snow and Tell: How the City Helps Residents Be In-the-Know About Snow

Quick Links, Facts and Phone Numbers

When winter weather strikes, turn to the city’s website at www.rockvillemd.gov.

Closure and snow emergency information will be available on the website, as well as through Facebook (www.facebook.com/cityofrockville) and Twitter (@rockville411), and by signing up for Alert Rockville notifications at www.rockvillemd.gov/alerts.

City crews treat and plow roads in the following priority order:

1) Primary roads that consist of major arterial roads, emergency routes, central business districts and primary residential roads near schools.

2) Secondary roads that consist of the remainder of neighborhood streets, alleyways and cul-de-sacs. To check if an address is within the city limits, find the Address and Residency Check map at www.rockvillemd.gov/maps.

Removing snow from sidewalks, driveways and entrances is the responsibility of the property and/or business owner or occupant unless a community association has assumed the responsibility. Snow and ice must be cleared from all paved sidewalks abutting a property as follows:

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Peerless Honors Stewardship, Landscaping and a History Book

The 40th annual Peerless Rockville awards ceremony, held Nov. 15 at Lakewood Country Club, recognized efforts to preserve Rockville’s historic and architectural character. This year’s honorees were:

  • John Williams and Gail Monahan (owners), Jeff Broadhurst (architect), Bill Schweinsberg (contractor) and Al Delancy and Jim Warner (carpenters) for the rehabilitation/renovation and stewardship of a historic property at 103 S. Washington St.
  • Max and Mary Van Balgooy, for landscaping at 313 Twinbrook Parkway.
  • Rockville Cemetery Association, Burt Hall, president, and Elise Polydoroff, director, for landscaping, stewardship and sustainable design at Rockville Cemetery, 1350 Baltimore Road.
  • Posthumous recognition of Warren Crutchfield for his lifetime of preservation advocacy, promotion of community history and stewardship of historic properties, including Haiti Cemetery. To learn more about Crutchfield’s efforts, visit youtube.com/cityofrockville and search “Haiti Cemetery.”
  • Jamie Kuhns, author; Joey Lampl, a cultural resources manager and Kuhns’ supervisor; museum manager Shirl Spicer; and museum educator Lisa MacLeman; all of Montgomery Parks, who received the Wagman Award, for Kuhn’s book “Sharp Flashes of Lightning Come from Dark Clouds: The Life of Josiah Henson.” Named for Arthur M. Wagman, a Peerless Rockville founder, the award honors outstanding achievements by writers, educators, historians and others whose work has heightened public awareness of Rockville’s heritage.

Peerless Rockville is an award-winning, community-based nonprofit founded in 1974 to preserve buildings, objects and information important to Rockville’s heritage.

Learn more at www.peerlessrockville.org or call 301-762-0096.

Matching Grant Program Seeks Projects to Improve Rockville Communities

Applications Available Dec. 13

The city’s matching grant program seeks to help neighbors work together to accomplish common goals supporting the health, vitality and inclusivity of the place they call home.

The application period for the Community Empowerment Grants program opens Friday, Dec. 13. Applications are due Thursday, Jan. 30.

Neighborhood, civic or homeowners associations; community groups; organized groups of neighbors; and student groups are eligible to apply. Neighbors and organizations who are willing to match funding through cash, in-kind donations and volunteer hours are eligible for these competitive grants.

Applications are reviewed and grants are awarded by the City Manager’s Office. Grants typically range from $500-$1,000 each, must benefit a clearly identified area within the city limits and may address any or all of the following objectives:

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Meet a Rockville Employee: Alyssa Roff

Alyssa Roff

Alyssa Roff, a senior transportation planner, and the city’s pedestrian and bicycle coordinator, has been on the job since Oct. 21. We asked her to answer a few questions to introduce her to the community.

What does a transportation planner do?

I work with transportation policies, projects and committees to help provide safe connections for people to get around Rockville. For the city, I focus mainly on cyclists and pedestrians.

Where were you before coming to Rockville?

I was a transportation planner for the City of Gaithersburg.

You also serve as the liaison to the Rockville Pedestrian Advocacy Committee. How are you helping the committee to partner with the city in making Rockville’s streets safer for all?
My role as the staff liaison is to offer transparency and spaces for collaboration. For each committee, I make sure everyone has a chance to provide their concerns and ideas for making city streets safer – the more creative ideas the better. I also provide updates on city projects so everyone can gauge what actions the city is taking.

Find tips for safe walking and driving on city streets this winter at www.nhtsa.gov/road-safety/pedestrian-safety.

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Peerless to Unveil Exhibit on Rockville and the Underground Railroad

A new Peerless Rockville exhibit exploring the history of the Underground Railroad in Rockville opens this month at the historic Red Brick Courthouse.

“Forging Freedom: Endurance and Escape on Rockville’s Underground Railroad” opens with a reception at 7 p.m. Friday, Dec. 6 at the Red Brick Courthouse, 29 Courthouse Square. This exhibit explores life under slavery in Rockville, the courageous stories of fugitives from Rockville, and the network of abolitionists, agents and conductors who assisted slaves in their flights to freedom. The reception is free. A $5 donation is suggested. Light refreshments will be served.

Learn more at www.peerlessrockville.org or call 301-762-0096.

Lunar New Year: Save the Date to Celebrate

Celebrate Rockville’s Asian cultures with performances, crafts and cultural displays at the city’s Lunar New Year celebration.

The annual celebration will be held from 1-3:30 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 1, at Rockville High School, 2100 Baltimore Road. Multicultural performances will be from 1:30-2:45 p.m. The city is organizing the celebration in partnership with Rockville’s Asian Pacific American Task Force.

In its 12th year, the Lunar New Year celebration is a source of pride for the city’s Asian community and an educational opportunity for neighbors to learn about Asian culture. The celebration will mark 4718, the Year of the Rat on the Chinese Zodiac calendar. One in three Rockville residents was born outside the United States and 54 percent of the city’s foreign-born population was born in Asia, according to the city’s planning department.

Interested in participating by providing a Lunar New Year-themed activity or craft? Contact Amanda Knox at aknox@rockvillemd.gov for more information.

Find additional details, as they become available, at www.rockvillemd.gov/lunarnewyear.

Green Giving and Electronics Recycling

Do you plan on giving new electronics as a gift for the holidays?

For products that help reduce environmental impacts and energy costs, look for Energy Star-qualified and Electronic Product Environmental Assessment Tool-registered products. Find more green gift ideas from Montgomery County’s Gift Outside the Box Campaign at www.montgomerycountymd.gov/dep/gift-greener.html.

Rockville collects and recycles electronics, such as cell phones, computers, televisions and holiday lights.

To make a bulk waste or electronics recycling collection appointment, call 240-314-8568. For more information on recycling and trash service or holiday tree collection, visit www.rockvillemd.gov/recycling-trash.

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